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Las Vegas shooting: More than 50 dead and 200 injured

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At least 50 people have been killed and more than 200 are injured after a gunman opened fire on crowds at a music festival in Las Vegas in the worst mass shooting in US history, reported The Independent (UK).

Two festival-goers said they initially heard a noise "like firecrackers", but it became apparent a shooter was unloading "clip after clip" into the crowd, discharging hundreds of bullets using an automatic weapon.

One man insisted there were "multiple shooters" involved, but police later ruled this out identifying the "lone wolf" suspect as 64-year-old white male Stephen Paddock from Nevada.

Las Vegas Sheriff Joseph Lombardo said Paddock was neutralised in a hotel room on the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Hotel. He told a press conference numerous weapons had been found in the room and a search was also due to take place shortly at his home address.

At least 50 have died and more than 200 are injured after a gunman opened fire on crowds at a country music festival in Las Vegas, Nevada. The gunman has been identified by authorities as Stephen Paddock of Nevada, and was reportedly taken down at the scene by police. Police said they found numerous weapons in his hotel room on the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay hotel.

Tributes have been pouring in to the victims of the Las Vegas shooting from political figures across the globe.

Prime Minister Theresa May said "The UK's thoughts are with the victims and the emergency services responding to the appalling attack in Las Vegas."

Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson said: "I am horrified by the awful attack at a music festival in Las Vegas this morning. The United Kingdom stands with the American people against this indiscriminate violence. My thoughts are with all those caught up in it.

“The Foreign and Commonwealth Office is in contact with Las Vegas authorities to establish whether any British people were caught up in the attack and we are ready to help however we can. Any British people in Las Vegas should follow the instructions of local authorities.”

US President Donald Trump has offered his condolences to the victims of the Las Vegas mass shooting.

Police investigating the mass shooting of concert-goers at a music festival in Las Vegas have said they are not treating the incident as an act of terrorism.
But Nevada law suggests the Sunday night massacre of at least 50 people can be defined as such.

The state's statute says an “act of terrorism means any act that involves the use or attempted use of sabotage, coercion or violence which is intended to cause great bodily harm or death to the general population”.

From his vantage point of the nearby Delano Hotel’s 64th floor Skyfall bar, one eyewitness Jake Freedman said he could see “people getting massacred right in front of us”.

“We could see hundreds of people running out of the festival,” he said. “I asked my friend, ‘Are those bodies hitting the floor’? Sure enough, there were bodies hitting the ground.

“We saw people getting shot. We saw everybody running out, and people getting gunned down. People were getting massacred right in front of us.”
Police said a number of officers have been killed or injured in the Las Vegas shooting.

Las Vegas Sheriff Joseph Lombardo said one of his officers who were off duty at the concert was killed. Another was injured. Earlier in the day he said police believed a couple of off-duty officers had been killed.

California's Bakersfield police department said a number of officers were in attendance in an off-duty capacity. One was shot and injured, but their injuries are not believed to be critical.

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Tags: u.s., Las Vegas
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